Upcoming Class at 18 Reasons: Flavors of India – Home Cooking Basics

shrimp-curry-2

There’s not much Stacie and I enjoy more than cooking together, learning recipes from moms and dads and developing recipes and cooking classes (and of course teaching them!).  We have a brand new cooking class coming up at one of our favorite venues – 18 Reasons – in May, and it is going to focus on every day Indian home cooking – the stuff we eat at home that you will not get in a restaurant. :)

We have learned over the years that Indian spices and Indian cooking mystifies people.  As much as people love Indian food, most prefer to eat it out, versus learn how to cook it themselves.  Unfortunately, in my humble opinion, the Indian food at home is far superior to almost anything you can find in a restaurant (I also had the good fortune of growing up in a family of AMAZING cooks).  Ask me what my favorite Indian restaurant is in San Francisco (a very common question), and you will catch me looking befuddled and searching desperately for (a polite) answer.  That’s because my mama makes the best Indian food and no restaurant (in San Francisco) compares.

Here are the details for our Indian home-cooking class – we are SUPER excited about it.  Tickets at this link.

Flavors of India: Home Cooking Basics

  • 18 Reasons in San Francisco
  • Sunday, May 17th – 4:00 PM to 7:30 PM

Love Indian food, but haven’t tried cooking it at home yet? Want to spice up your family dinners with some new flavors? Learn Indian home cooking basics to get yourself started: from essential spices, Indian food made easy enough to cook everyday and tips on cooking techniques like tempering, working with dough and making your own spice mixes.

  • Mom’s Everyday Channa Dhal
  • Shrimp “Curry in a Hurry”
  • Indian-Spiced Creamed Spinach
  • Spiced-Roasted Cauliflower
  • Turkey Chappali Kebabs
  • Carrot Raita
  • Coriander Chutney
  • Home-made Madras Curry Powder
  • Paranthas
  • Masala Chai & treat

Nasi Goreng: Malaysian Fried Rice

nasi goreng

Every year, Stacie and I, in teams with our summer campers lead a fried rice cook-off and every year, I “somehow” seem to lose.  I always blame the judges and their “lame” palates and tastebuds, but maybe, just maybe Stacie is better at making fried rice. :)

This nasi goreng is a pretty simple, but quite a delicious and satisfying dish.  It takes a Chinese classic and spices it up a little bit.  The magic of this Malaysian-style fried rice lies in the flavorful base, a spice paste of chiles, garlic and shallots.  Leftover rice usually works best as it is drier and fries up better. This dish is a great vehicle for other leftovers as well – you can add leftover chicken, other cooked meats, leftover vegetables and tofu as well.  It is a bit of a spicier dish, but you can adjust the amount of chilli or use milder chillies.  Or frankly as your kids get older, have them try some spicy dishes (raising the spice level as time passes) – constant exposure will get them eating dishes with more spices/chilli in them. Continue reading

Discovering New Flavors with The Hatchery

The Hatchery_A Little YumminessThis is up there among fun and cool gifts for your favorite foodie-type person. I have my lovely sister in law to thank for introducing me to The Hatchery. She gave me a subscription to their tasting boxes last Christmas, so each month I have been receiving an assortment of mini-sized condiments and ingredients made by small, artisan producers all around the country. You get just enough of each item to try it out for a meal or recipe and then, of course, if you fall in love with something, you can order full-sized versions for stocking your pantry. Continue reading

Magic Mustard Sauce

mustard sauce

I stand entirely corrected when it comes to Scandinavian cuisine – I have gone from a total “hater” to someone who LOVES the cuisine.  I am always looking for excuses to visit Pläj, one of the best Scandinavian restaurants in San Francisco.  I have also (somewhat) successfully converted some my foodie Asian friends who were convinced, like I was, that the cuisine is bland and horrible, by taking them the restaurant.  Yes, we suffered from a superiority complex and we were missing out because of it.  I suspect eating IKEA’s meatballs had something to do with perpetuating our biases.  Real Swedish meatballs are amazing and a dish that you cannot stop eating.

Yes, compared to the food I cook, Scandinavian food is simple.  But it isn’t without immense flavor.  Scandinavian cooking and ingredients are truly unique and the cuisine is deeply influenced by what nature has “forced” upon the people of the region.  Long, dark winters along the Arctic Circle have greatly influenced the cuisine of Scandinavia from Viking times to the current renaissance of “New Nordic” cuisine. Foraging in bountiful times, preserving food for survival during icy winters, a deep connection to the landscape and environment, and a celebration of design, all give an insight into the culture, history and cuisine of the region.  And suddenly, all food Scandinavian is receiving it’s rightly deserved global acclaim.  Meanwhile, I am obsessed with “The Scandinavian Kitchen” cookbook by Camilla Plum and working my way through it.  Perhaps a vacation to a Scandinavian country is next. :)

The mustard sauce below is a bit of a revelation.  We taught the recipe at a recent cooking class for high-schoolers. I brought the leftovers home and refused to share them with anyone.  It’s a great sauce to have lying around in the refrigerator as it revives even the most boring of dinners. Continue reading

Two Yummy, Fun Vegan Birthday Treats

Recently my littlest guy had a birthday and celebrating with his buddies meant figuring our some yummy treats that could be dairy and egg free. We ended up with two tasty desserts for two different celebrations and wanted to share them because it’s always good to have a few extra ideas up your sleeve when it comes to vegan desserts.

Rice Krispy Sushi Continue reading

Summer Camp 2015 Registration is Open

A Little Yumminess Camp Logo

We’re so excited that it’s time to start thinking about our A Little Yumminess Around the World summer camp, one of our favorite parts of the year. Registration is now open and we expect slots to fill up fast, so do sign up right away if you’re interested.  We are almost half-full already from early registration for returning campers with several campers coming back for the third time!!

We’re bringing back our popular “Cooking Around the World” camp for younger kids during which we’ll visit a different country each day and cook our own snacks and lunch. We’ll also have time for some crafts, kitchen science and other food and culture and community service-related activities.  It’s always amazing to see what kids, even this young, can do in the kitchen and how much energy and creativity they bring to the final dishes that we make together. We’re devoting two sessions this summer to a slightly new format for older kids (entering 3rd through 5th). We’ve picked “Great Cities” as our theme and our campers will not only be learning about and cooking food from around the world, they will be planning and executing the menu from start to finish. In addition to hands-on cooking, they’ll have the chance to choose the menu, plan and shop. It’s going to be great fun and we having a blast developing the curriculum.

We’ve put much thought into creating the kind of camp that we’d love to send our own kids to, so we keep our camps small in size (maximum 21 campers) and teach each camp ourselves with the help of our trusted and experienced staff along with a few amazing junior counselors (to find out about our junior counselor program for kids entering 7th grade and up, email us at alittleyum@yahoo.com).

Throughout the week we will also have guest presenters including our favorite folks from Bernal Cutlery who will lead a knife skills session and our dear friend, blogger and self-proclaimed curd-nerd Anya Soltero, who will lead a Cheese 101 session.

Here are basic details for all 3 sessions, please click over to our “camps” page for more information. We hope to see your young, budding cooks this summer!

  • Time: 9am-3pm (early & extended care are not available)
  • Cost: $475 per session ($425 + $50 materials fee, snacks and lunch provided each day)
  • Location: Marin Preparatory School (Diamond at 18th Street in San Francisco)
  • Session 1: 6/22/15 – 6/26/15 –  Entering Grades 3-5, “Great Cities of the World: Paris, Tokyo, Barcelona, Rome, San Francisco” – Click here to register
  • Session 2: 7/27/15 – 7/31/15 – Entering Grades 1-4, “Cooking Around the World: Italy, India, Middle East, Mexico, Hawaii” – Click here to register
  • Session 3: 8/3/15 – 8/7/15 – Entering Grades 3-5, “Great Cities of the World: Paris, Tokyo, Barcelona, Rome, San Francisco” – Click here to register

If none of the sessions work for you this year – please email us at alittleyum@yahoo.com and ask to be put on our mailing list for next year and other events throughout the year.

Yumminess camp collage part 1

 

 

 

Cheese-making for Kids at 18 Reasons

MM Cheese for Kids

It sure is good to be a kid these days.  Amazing summer camps, parents shuttling you from one fun activity to another and now this super-fun cheese-making session with San Francisco’s very own milkmaid – Louella Hill.  We recently met Louella at a potluck party and she showed up with some gorgeous cheeses to share, all that she made by herself!  They were spectacular and we are in awe of her cheese-making skills.  She is offering, what I am sure will be very informative and fun class home cheese-making class, on February 8th at our favorite foodie venue in San Francisco, 18 Reasons.  Unfortunately our kiddos cannot make it, but if you are around and available, you must sign your kids up!

In two fun-filled hours, you’ll learn about chemistry and food history as you magically turn milk into curds and whey. While that recipe drains, you’ll have a ball making braids and lassos out of just-stretched mozzarella. Plus you head home with your very own cheese project to complete. Continue reading