The Most Requested Meal

Salmon by Luca-A Little Yumminess

Using the ricer

Puttin’ some muscle into it!

It goes in phases, but the most requested meal at Casa Stacie right now is oven roasted salmon and mashed potatoes (and a green veg or salad for good measure). The kids ask for this dinner all the time and so it’s a frequent one on our dinner table. They’ve also asked to learn how to make this meal themselves. So each time we cook this dinner they have been taking on more and more of cooking tasks. They’ve been working on: Continue reading

A Week of Eating Vegan….

Well – almost a week – and I must say it wasn’t as difficult as I thought it would be.  The little one was horrified and there was all kinds of (very amusing) protesting and whining.  Perhaps, I should be pleased that she even knows what a vegan diet consists of.  However, she did just fine, and her dairy was not taken from her – she still had her milk and cheese. :)  And, I did fine too, even though I gave up caffeine, alcohol and sugar (I did eat fruits), in addition.  Interestingly, I craved sugar more than anything else. Here are some highlights from the week…to inspire you…


White bean soup with baked crispy kale (this bowl has parmesan cheese – my bowl did not).  Super creamy, yummy and satisfying soup served with a side of hearty walnut bread.  Made for a great school lunch the next day and we made an extra large vat that lasted a few days. Continue reading

Rick Bayless’ Garlic-Lime Mojo Popcorn with Cilantro & Queso Anejo

Rick Bayless_Mojo Popcorn by a Little Yumminess

I’m always on the lookout for interesting savory snacks and this is one of the best ones I’ve come across in a long, long while. You’ve got the tangy-savory flavors of lime and garlic infused olive oil that you use for both popping and seasoning the popcorn, then you top things off with a salty, crumbly Mexican cheese (such as queso anejo) and a generous amount of finely chopped cilantro for a bit of brightness. I would also suggest adding a little chile flake (Japanese togarashi would be nice) to the mix if you’re a fan of heat.  Continue reading

Upcoming Class at 18 Reasons: Flavors of India – Home Cooking Basics


There’s not much Stacie and I enjoy more than cooking together, learning recipes from moms and dads and developing recipes and cooking classes (and of course teaching them!).  We have a brand new cooking class coming up at one of our favorite venues – 18 Reasons – in May, and it is going to focus on every day Indian home cooking – the stuff we eat at home that you will not get in a restaurant. :)

We have learned over the years that Indian spices and Indian cooking mystifies people.  As much as people love Indian food, most prefer to eat it out, versus learn how to cook it themselves.  Unfortunately, in my humble opinion, the Indian food at home is far superior to almost anything you can find in a restaurant (I also had the good fortune of growing up in a family of AMAZING cooks).  Ask me what my favorite Indian restaurant is in San Francisco (a very common question), and you will catch me looking befuddled and searching desperately for (a polite) answer.  That’s because my mama makes the best Indian food and no restaurant (in San Francisco) compares.

Here are the details for our Indian home-cooking class – we are SUPER excited about it.  Tickets at this link.

Flavors of India: Home Cooking Basics

  • 18 Reasons in San Francisco
  • Sunday, May 17th – 4:00 PM to 7:30 PM

Love Indian food, but haven’t tried cooking it at home yet? Want to spice up your family dinners with some new flavors? Learn Indian home cooking basics to get yourself started: from essential spices, Indian food made easy enough to cook everyday and tips on cooking techniques like tempering, working with dough and making your own spice mixes.

  • Mom’s Everyday Channa Dhal
  • Shrimp “Curry in a Hurry”
  • Indian-Spiced Creamed Spinach
  • Spiced-Roasted Cauliflower
  • Turkey Chappali Kebabs
  • Carrot Raita
  • Coriander Chutney
  • Home-made Madras Curry Powder
  • Paranthas
  • Masala Chai & treat

Nasi Goreng: Malaysian Fried Rice

nasi goreng

Every year, Stacie and I, in teams with our summer campers lead a fried rice cook-off and every year, I “somehow” seem to lose.  I always blame the judges and their “lame” palates and tastebuds, but maybe, just maybe Stacie is better at making fried rice. :)

This nasi goreng is a pretty simple, but quite a delicious and satisfying dish.  It takes a Chinese classic and spices it up a little bit.  The magic of this Malaysian-style fried rice lies in the flavorful base, a spice paste of chiles, garlic and shallots.  Leftover rice usually works best as it is drier and fries up better. This dish is a great vehicle for other leftovers as well – you can add leftover chicken, other cooked meats, leftover vegetables and tofu as well.  It is a bit of a spicier dish, but you can adjust the amount of chilli or use milder chillies.  Or frankly as your kids get older, have them try some spicy dishes (raising the spice level as time passes) – constant exposure will get them eating dishes with more spices/chilli in them. Continue reading

Discovering New Flavors with The Hatchery

The Hatchery_A Little YumminessThis is up there among fun and cool gifts for your favorite foodie-type person. I have my lovely sister in law to thank for introducing me to The Hatchery. She gave me a subscription to their tasting boxes last Christmas, so each month I have been receiving an assortment of mini-sized condiments and ingredients made by small, artisan producers all around the country. You get just enough of each item to try it out for a meal or recipe and then, of course, if you fall in love with something, you can order full-sized versions for stocking your pantry. Continue reading

Magic Mustard Sauce

mustard sauce I stand entirely corrected when it comes to Scandinavian cuisine – I have gone from a total “hater” to someone who LOVES the cuisine.  I am always looking for excuses to visit Pläj, one of the best Scandinavian restaurants in San Francisco.  I have also (somewhat) successfully converted some my foodie Asian friends who were convinced, like I was, that the cuisine is bland and horrible, by taking them the restaurant.  Yes, we suffered from a superiority complex and we were missing out because of it.  I suspect eating IKEA’s meatballs had something to do with perpetuating our biases.  Real Swedish meatballs are amazing and a dish that you cannot stop eating. Yes, compared to the food I cook, Scandinavian food is simple.  But it isn’t without immense flavor.  Scandinavian cooking and ingredients are truly unique and the cuisine is deeply influenced by what nature has “forced” upon the people of the region.  Long, dark winters along the Arctic Circle have greatly influenced the cuisine of Scandinavia from Viking times to the current renaissance of “New Nordic” cuisine. Foraging in bountiful times, preserving food for survival during icy winters, a deep connection to the landscape and environment, and a celebration of design, all give an insight into the culture, history and cuisine of the region.  And suddenly, all food Scandinavian is receiving it’s rightly deserved global acclaim.  Meanwhile, I am obsessed with “The Scandinavian Kitchen” cookbook by Camilla Plum and working my way through it.  Perhaps a vacation to a Scandinavian country is next. :) The mustard sauce below is a bit of a revelation.  We taught the recipe at a recent cooking class for high-schoolers. I brought the leftovers home and refused to share them with anyone.  It’s a great sauce to have lying around in the refrigerator as it revives even the most boring of dinners. Continue reading