Magic Mustard Sauce

mustard sauce I stand entirely corrected when it comes to Scandinavian cuisine – I have gone from a total “hater” to someone who LOVES the cuisine.  I am always looking for excuses to visit Pläj, one of the best Scandinavian restaurants in San Francisco.  I have also (somewhat) successfully converted some my foodie Asian friends who were convinced, like I was, that the cuisine is bland and horrible, by taking them the restaurant.  Yes, we suffered from a superiority complex and we were missing out because of it.  I suspect eating IKEA’s meatballs had something to do with perpetuating our biases.  Real Swedish meatballs are amazing and a dish that you cannot stop eating. Yes, compared to the food I cook, Scandinavian food is simple.  But it isn’t without immense flavor.  Scandinavian cooking and ingredients are truly unique and the cuisine is deeply influenced by what nature has “forced” upon the people of the region.  Long, dark winters along the Arctic Circle have greatly influenced the cuisine of Scandinavia from Viking times to the current renaissance of “New Nordic” cuisine. Foraging in bountiful times, preserving food for survival during icy winters, a deep connection to the landscape and environment, and a celebration of design, all give an insight into the culture, history and cuisine of the region.  And suddenly, all food Scandinavian is receiving it’s rightly deserved global acclaim.  Meanwhile, I am obsessed with “The Scandinavian Kitchen” cookbook by Camilla Plum and working my way through it.  Perhaps a vacation to a Scandinavian country is next. 🙂 The mustard sauce below is a bit of a revelation.  We taught the recipe at a recent cooking class for high-schoolers. I brought the leftovers home and refused to share them with anyone.  It’s a great sauce to have lying around in the refrigerator as it revives even the most boring of dinners. Continue reading